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Adult Programs in March

Teen Programs in March

Youth Programs in February

Youth Programs in March

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Adult Programs in February

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fletcher Free Library does not endorse the perspectives and viewpoints of the authors and artists whose work is represented in our collections or exhibits.

ART EXHIBITS

None

PROGRAMS

GREEN BURIAL AND THE VERMONT LAW
Saturday, February 11, 1:30 pm
Fletcher Room
Many Vermonters are surprised to learn that green burial is not an option in Vermont.  However, a new bill introduced at the state house could change that by changing the mandatory minimum burial depth.  Come learn about the bill, why burial depth is important, and the environmental benefits of green burial on rehabilitating, preserving, and conserving habitats.  This program is hosted by end-of-life specialist and green-burial-educator Michelle Acciavatti and wildlife biologist and green-burial-educator Carl Anderson.  It includes a screening of the short documentary, “Dying Green”, followed by a brief presentation about green burial in Vermont and a discussion. For more information visit vermontgreenburial.wordpress.com and direct questions to vermontgreenburial@gmail.com

Exploring human origins: What Does it Mean to be Human?
A smithsonian institution exhibition
February 18 - March 17

Opening reception:
Wednesday, February 22, 5:30 pm

Explore the web site!

The Fletcher Free Library has been selected nationwide as one of 19 public libraries to host a Smithsonian exhibition.

Exploring Human Origins: What Does it Mean to be Human? is a traveling exhibition organized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Programs Office.  This project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund.

Through panels, interactive kiosks, interactive displays, and videos, the exhibition invites audiences to explore milestones in the evolutionary journey of becoming human — from walking upright, creating technology and eating new foods, to brain enlargement and the development of symbolic language and complex societies — advancements that define the unique position of humans in the history of life.

Fletcher Free Library Book Discussion:
Absence of Mind by Marilynne Robinson
Wednesday, February 8, 6:30 pm
Local History Room
Join this monthly book discussion on the second Wednesday of each month.  Free copies of the book are available for checkout at the Library’s circulation desk.

Book Synopsis:
In this ambitious book, acclaimed writer Marilynne Robinson applies her
astute intellect to some of the most vexing topics in the history of
human thought—science, religion, and consciousness. Crafted with the
same care and insight as her award-winning novels, Absence of Mind
challenges postmodern atheists who crusade against religion under the
banner of science.

Educator Workshop
Wednesday, February 22, 10 am - 2 pm
Fletcher Room
Dr. Briana Pobiner, who leads the Human Origins Program's education and outreach efforts, and Dr. Connie Bertka, will present a 2-4 hour workshop on human evolution for science educators.  The workshop is for classroom teachers; science, nature center, and museum educators; homeschoolers; and other local educators.  It will feature exploration and hands-on practice in presenting the Human Origins Program resources provided for each community.  These resources include a set of five early human skull casts; classroom-tested, high-school Biology teaching supplements on "What Does It Mean to Be Human?", and a teacher resource on cultural and religious sensitivity strategies.  Registration required.

Opening Reception and Science Talk, by Dr. Rick Potts
Wednesday, February 22, 5:30 pm
Main Reading Room and Fletcher Room
Join us for a Prehistoric-themed opening reception with faculty from the Smithsonian Institution.  Afterwards, Dr. Rick Potts will give a lecture for the general public about the latest research in human evolution and an overview of exhibition themes and messages.

Private Tour of Exhibit for Clergy Leaders
Thursday, February 23,  2:00 pm

Community Conversation with Smithsonian staff
Thursday, February 23, 6 pm
A community conversation on the topic titled "What Does Human Evolution Mean to You? A Community Conversation," led by the Broader Social Impacts Committeee co-chairs Drs. Connie Bertka and Jim Miller.

The discomfort felt by many people about evolution, particularly at the point where science and religion converge, has resulted in a lack of opportunities for the public to reflect on findings in human origins research and how these discoveries relate to people's personal understanding of the world and their place in it.  This program will offer that opportunity and address a popular misconception that there is an inherent conflict between science and religion in the area of human origins.  The BSIC has developed the Primer on Science, Religion, Evolution, and Creationism, a document that promotes a respectful, welcoming, and insightful public conversation on a topic audiences often see as troubling or prefer to avoid.
The primer may be found online - click here

What Does It Mean To Be Human? Film Series--
2001: A Space Odyssey
Saturday, February 25, 3:00 pm
Fletcher Room

Your Inner Fish
Tuesday, February 21, 10:00 am

"Genomics: Insights into Our Differences and Similarities"
by Dr. Deborah Leonard, Chair and Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UVM College of Medicine
Tuesday, February 28, 6:00 pm
Fletcher Room

FEEL BETTER!  with Anya Raven Hunter, MSW, LICSW
Stress - What It Is and What You Can Do About It 
Wednesday, February 1, 6:30-7:30 pm--CANCELLED
Fletcher Room

poetry Experience
First & Third Saturday of every month, 1-3 pm
February 4 & 18
Pickering Room

Computer workshops
Our popular computer classes will be offered again starting in February.  Registration begins after Dec. 30.  Free!  See full descriptions on the Computer Center pagePre-registration is required: Sign up for individual workshops at the Reference Desk (865.7217).

VERMONT PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
First Tuesday of every month, 6-8 pm
February 7
Fletcher Room
Inspired by the artist Frank Gonzalez, 91, a lifelong enthusiast of John Dewey, Nick Ruderman has formed a philosophy group in Burlington, Gonzalez’s summer home.

Similar to a university seminar, a guest lecturer will speak on a subject of philosophy followed by some discussion.  Forthcoming speakers may discuss ecology, Buddhism, Islamic philosophy, economics, jurisprudence, and history.  Discussion shall be directed according to the tenets of Dewey's version of pragmatism: fallibilism, naturalism, and pluralism.

GAMING FOR TEENS & ADULTS
Tuesdays, 5-7:45 pm
Pickering Room

CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE
Every Sunday, 4:30-6 pm
Community Room

Short Story Megaphone
Sundays, February 5, 12 & 19, 1-2 pm
Fletcher Room
This is a Stories Out Loud series, taking place once a week, in which a speaker reads aloud one or two short stories written by a favorite short story writer.  Each week we would read a story by a different author. This idea comes in part from the New Yorker's fiction podcast, which might act as a rough template.  The most foundational goal of this series is to share engaging and challenging literature with more members of our community—with the belief that many folks want to read more stories but often feel daunted by all that's out there.

UkUlele MELEE
2nd & 4th Sunday of every month, 4-6 pm
February 12 & 26
Fletcher Room
(“Mele” - Hawaiian word  for song)
Join other Burlington-area Ukulele lovers in a group to learn and play the Ukulele together.  Starting with 2-3 chord songs, simple visual prompts will assist in learning 1 or 2 songs together each session.  A wide range of styles and genres are encouraged, from folk and rock ukulele to jazz, improv, multi-instrument duets, ukulele accompanied poetry, and other wild and wacky ukulele acts still to be created.

Ages: Adults and kids 10 and up.  Bring your own Uke.

Slow & Curious Book Club
Sundays, February 12 & 26, 1-2 pm
Pickering Room
Are you a young adult with a passion for reading and sharing interesting books? Are you available on Sunday afternoons? Please join us for this new reading group. Potential reading material and topics include: short fiction, investigative journalism, Pulitzer Prize reading lists, National Book Award lists, environmental history, gender/relationships/sexuality, etc. What are your favorite authors, journalists, or topics? Bring your ideas to this new, collaborative, stimulating group!

classical music Hip cats
Wednesday, February 15, 5-7 pm
Fletcher Room
Come listen and play music on nylon string guitars in a friendly environment. There will be solo, duet and trio performances by local guitar musicians, professional and amateurs. All levels of skills and styles are welcome.

ELL  PROGRAMS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES
Every Wednesday, 6:30-8 pm  (Except: NO classes on Feb. 22)

Beginner Level:
Pickering Room, 2nd Floor

Intermediate/Advanced Level:
Administrative Conference Room, 2nd Floor

For more information, contact Barbara Shatara, FFL Programming Department, 865.7211.

CONVERSATION GROUPS

FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP - "Dimanches"
Every Sunday, 4-5:30 pm
Local History Room
Parlez-vous francais?  Meet others in the community who do too.  Join the group and practice foreign language conversation.  Fluency is not required (nor is attendance at every meeting).  For details contact Steve Norman at stevenorman@fastmail.fm

GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP
First and Third Wednesday of every month, 6-7:30 pm
February 1 & 15
Local History Room
Sprechen Sie Deutsch?  Meet others in the community who do too.  Join the group and practice foreign language conversation.  Fluency not required (nor is attendance at every meeting).

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Adult Programs in March

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fletcher Free Library does not endorse the perspectives and viewpoints of the authors and artists whose work is represented in our collections or exhibits.

ART EXHIBITS

Works by the Howard Center Arts Collective and
Belcate School

March 2 - April 1
Fletcher Room
Opening reception: Friday, March 10, 2 pm
Josh Simms from Belcate School and Adam Forguites from the Howard Center curate an exhibit of new works.

PROGRAMS

Exploring human origins: What Does it Mean to be Human?
A smithsonian institution exhibition
February 18 - March 17
Main Reading Room

Explore the web site!

Exploring Human Origins: What Does it Mean to be Human? is a traveling exhibition organized by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Programs Office.  This project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund.

Through panels, interactive kiosks, interactive displays, and videos, the exhibition invites audiences to explore milestones in the evolutionary journey of becoming human — from walking upright, creating technology and eating new foods, to brain enlargement and the development of symbolic language and complex societies — advancements that define the unique position of humans in the history of life.

lectures:

WHAT MAKES US SO SPECIAL? DOES HUMAN CULTURE MAKE HUMANS UNIQUE?  Lecture by Dr. Michael Lange
Wednesday, March 1, 6:30 pm
Fletcher Room
Dr. Lange examines the human desire to find out what makes us human.  Is our ability to have culture something particular to humans? Champlain College’s Dr. Michael A. Lange is an anthropologist and folklorist. His research interests include narrative, language and identity.

THE FIRST SIGNS:
TRACKING EARLY COMPLEX SOCIETY IN THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST
Lecture by Dr. David Ian Lightbody
Wednesday, March 8, 6:00 pm
Fletcher Room
At hilltops sites overlooking the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, archaeologists have uncovered very ancient temples close to the world’s first settlements. The circular stone temples contain strange symbols and carvings of animals which have proved difficult to interpret. In this talk we will explore these early ritual buildings, and examine how their strange signs and symbols contributed to the development of the first complex societies. We will trace out an intellectual journey through the Neolithic ‘revolution of symbols’ that led our ancestors towards the first true written scripts.  Dr. Lightbody is Co-Editor of the Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture and a former Lecturer in Egyptology, University of Glasgow.

MORE THAN MONEY: EXTENDING THE MEANINGS AND METHODOLOGIES OF FARMWORKER FOOD SECURITY
Lecture by Dr. Teresa Mares
Thursday, March 9, 6:30 pm
Fletcher Room
This talk examines household food security practices among Latino/a dairy workers in Vermont, revealing how the standardized questionnaires developed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to examine and quantify food security at the household level are inadequate for fully understanding the complexities of food access for migrant households. For migrant workers and their families who seek to sustain culturally meaningful foodways from home, the realities of living and working in Vermont’s rural economy present significant challenges to achieving food security on their own terms.

Teresa Mares is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Vermont and is affiliated with the Transdisciplinary Research Initiative in Food Systems. Dr. Mares’ research focuses on the intersection of food and migration studies, and she is particularly interested in the ways that the diets and foodways of Latino/a immigrants change as a result of migration. Analytically, Dr. Mares engages with theories and concepts of citizenship and transnationalism, identity and foodways, and contemporary social movements. She is committed to applied, community-based ethnographic methodologies and is currently studying food access and food security among Latino/a dairy workers in Vermont.

7th ANNUAL SEED SWAP
Saturday, March 11, 12 noon - 3 pm
Youth Area and Fletcher Room
This free community event celebrates the upcoming gardening season and brings gardeners together to share seeds, garden stories, and resources. Bring your own non-GMO seeds to share and exchange. Workshops and lectures for adults and families will be held in the upstairs meeting rooms.  The 7th annual Burlington Seed Swap is presented by Vermont Community Garden Network in partnership with the Fletcher Free Library, Burlington Parks Recreation & Waterfront, and Green Mountain Compost. Donations appreciated to benefit the Community Teaching Garden scholarship fund. For more information, go to www.vcgn.org or call 861-4769.

Workshops:

1:00 pm: Indigenous Vermont Agriculture, with Fred Wiseman

2:30 pm: Grow Your Own Food in Small Spaces and Container
             with Julie Rubaud

In this workshop, we will discuss ways to maximize pleasure and increase the yield of harvests in small spaces including container gardens, windowsill herbs, and raised beds. From the front stoop to the back deck, there are many ways to grow what you like to eat and to do it in a way that is not too time consuming. Let's discuss how to significantly add fresh flavor to your table and meals.

Julie Rubaud is owner of Red Wagon Plants in Hinesburg.

THE ETHICS OF END-OF-LIFE CARE
Lecture by Dr. Robert Macauley
Tuesday, March 14, 6:30 pm
Fletcher Room
Dr. Robert Conover MacCauley is the UVM Medical Center Medical Director, Clinical Ethics and Pediatric Palliative Medicine Physician Professor, University of Vermont College of Medicine.

TALES OF THE EX-APES:
HOW WE THINK ABOUT HUMAN EVOLUTION
Lecture by Dr. Jonathan Marks
Thursday, March 23 at 6pm
Main Reading Room
Ancestors and relatives are always special to human societies, even to scientific ones. As partly historical narrative and partly science, the study of human origins has properties which make it quite distinct from zoology more generally.  For example, when narrating the evolution of our species, we tend to focus on continuity, making human evolution appear to be more linear than it actually is, but the discontinuity is important as well. Further, scientists that study human origins have created species such as “Homo sapiens Europaeus albus” and “Homo soloensis,” which never existed in the natural realm, and are best understood as fictive kin and ancestors. Thus, understanding the “reality” of a new fossil taxon like Homo naledi involves grappling with the fact that it is not so much a unit of zoology, as a unit of mythology – that is to say, more real as a human relative than as a naturalistic species.

Jonathan Marks is a prominent evolutionary anthropologist with a focus on the history of science, racism and human biocultural diversity and has authored several books on these topics, including What It Means To Be 98% Chimpanzee (2002, University of California Press), Why I Am Not A Scientist: Anthropology and Modern Knowledge (2009, University of California Press), Tales of the ex-Apes: How We Think about Human Evolution (2015, University of California Press), and Is Science Racist?: Debating Race (2017, Polity Press).

Workshops:

Who’s Your Grand-daddy?  Genealogy Workshop
Saturday, March 18, 12 noon - 2:00 pm
Local History Room
At the close of the Exploring Human Origins exhibit, take a closer look at your not-so-distant relatives.  Discover ways to trace how far your family tree extends.  Certified genealogists and our librarians will help you navigate the resources available for tracking down your great-grand-daddys and grand-mothers. If you’ve ever wanted to know more about your family ancestry, or maybe you’re just curious about genealogy, stop in at this free workshop and get started.

ARTS AND CULTURE - WHAT IS YOUR STORY?
Wednesday, March 29, 6:00 pm
Fletcher Room
What arts (visual, performing, spoken, written, musical, culinary) do you carry from your culture? What arts have you left behind? Which ones have you recovered? What do your culture's arts mean to you? Burlington playwright Joy Cohen is creating a theatrical piece about the Little Jerusalem community as it existed in 1910. One major theme at the centerpiece of the story is the human need to create and carry their culture's art  - even in the most dire of circumstances.  Come join us as we explore our rich and diverse cultures, and the ways in which we use the arts to create identity, community, and social justice.

film series:

What Does It Mean To Be Human? Film Series
All screenings are at 3:00 pm
Fletcher Room (unless otherwise noted)

March 4: The Adventures of Pinocchio

March 11 (in Community Room): Into the Wild

March 18: A.I.

March 25: Bicentennial Man

April 1: Being Human

Documentary Film Series
March 15, 10:00 am: Nova: Becoming Human-- Unearthing Our Earliest Ancestors

March 22, 6:30 pm: Unbroken Grounds with NOFA panel of farmers

music performance:

TURNmusic
Tuesday, March 7, 7:00 pm
Fletcher Room
TURNmusic, Vermont’s contemporary chamber music ensemble, will perform pieces that explore the evolution of human origins, as well as the evolution of sound, melody, theme, and musical composition.  The program features music by multi-instrumentalist Richard Reed Parry (Montreal’s Arcade Fire).  Parry’s set of compositions from his first solo album, Music for Heart and Breath,  are driven by each player’s heartbeat.  The musicians plays in sync with their own heartbeat or their own breath and must wear a stethoscope while performing.  Also featured is Eve Beglarian’s  I am a very simple person, John Luther Adams’, Songbirds, Molly Joyce’s Head to Toe, and more.

AARP Tax Aide Program
Sundays in March
Community Room
By appointment-- 12:30 pm, 2:00 pm & 3:30 pm (call the Heineberg Senior Center at 802.863.3982)
Drop-ins accepted when time is available
The AARP tax aides assist with tax preparation.  This is a free service. 
For more Information:
https://secure.aarp.org/applications/VMISLocator/searchTaxAideLocations.action

Fletcher Free Library Book Discussion:
Where’d You Go Bernadette by Maria Semple
Wednesday, March 8, 6:30 pm
Local History Room
Check out this monthly discussion group on the second Wednesday at 6:30pm.  This month, the group goes looking for Bernadette Fox in Maria Semple’s novel, Where’s You Go, Bernadette.  Free copies of the book are available for checkout at the library’s circulation desk.

Book Synopsis:
Bernadette Fox is notorious. To her Microsoft-guru husband, she's a fearlessly opinionated partner; to fellow private-school mothers in Seattle, she's a disgrace; to design mavens, she's a revolutionary architect, and to 15-year-old Bee, she is a best friend and, simply, Mom.

Then Bernadette disappears. It began when Bee aced her report card and claimed her promised reward: a family trip to Antarctica. But Bernadette's intensifying allergy to Seattle--and people in general--has made her so agoraphobic that a virtual assistant in India now runs her most basic errands. A trip to the end of the earth is problematic.

To find her mother, Bee compiles email messages, official documents, secret correspondence--creating a compulsively readable and touching novel about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter's role in an absurd world

poetry Experience
First & Third Saturday of every month, 1-3 pm
March 4 & 18
Pickering Room
Share your own work and learn from others in this supportive writers group.  All ages and experience welcome.

Computer workshops
Our popular computer classes will be offered again starting in February.  Registration begins after Dec. 30.  Free!  See full descriptions on the Computer Center pagePre-registration is required: Sign up for individual workshops at the Reference Desk (865.7217).

GAMING FOR TEENS & ADULTS
Tuesdays, 5-7:45 pm (except not on March 7)
Pickering Room

UkUlele MELEE
2nd & 4th Sunday of every month, 4-6 pm
March 12 & 26
Fletcher Room
(“Mele” - Hawaiian word  for song)
Join other Burlington-area Ukulele lovers in a group to learn and play the Ukulele together.  Starting with 2-3 chord songs, simple visual prompts will assist in learning 1 or 2 songs together each session.  A wide range of styles and genres are encouraged, from folk and rock ukulele to jazz, improv, multi-instrument duets, ukulele accompanied poetry, and other wild and wacky ukulele acts still to be created.

Ages: Adults and kids 10 and up.  Bring your own Uke.

classical music Hip cats
Wednesday, March 15, 5-7 pm
Fletcher Room
Come listen and play music on nylon string guitars in a friendly environment. There will be solo, duet and trio performances by local guitar musicians, professional and amateurs. All levels of skills and styles are welcome.

ELL  PROGRAMS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES
Every Wednesday, 6:30-8 pm

Beginner Level:
Pickering Room, 2nd Floor

Intermediate/Advanced Level:
Administrative Conference Room, 2nd Floor

English-language learners of all abilities can practice written and spoken English in either Beginner or Intermediate/Advanced levels of English classes.  Grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, idioms and American culture are covered.  Classes are drop-in friendly, no registration is required.

For more information, contact Barbara Shatara, FFL Programming Department, 865.7211.

CONVERSATION GROUPS

FRENCH CONVERSATION GROUP - "Dimanches"
Every Sunday, 4-5:30 pm
Local History Room
Parlez-vous francais?  Meet others in the community who do too.  Join the group and practice foreign language conversation.  Fluency is not required (nor is attendance at every meeting).  For details contact Steve Norman at stevenorman@fastmail.fm

GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP
First and Third Wednesday of every month, 6-7:30 pm
March 1 & 15
Local History Room
Sprechen Sie Deutsch?  Meet others in the community who do too.  Join the group and practice foreign language conversation.  Fluency not required (nor is attendance at every meeting).

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All programs are free and open to the public at the Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street, Burlington.  For more information, contact Barbara Shatara, Programs & Partnerships Librarian Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street, Burlington, VT 05401.  Phone: 802-865-7211.  Email: bshatara@burlingtonvt.gov

 

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, every effort will be made to make our programs accessible to individuals with disabilities.  Please contact us at least two weeks prior to the program you wish to attend.  To make arrangements, please call 865.7211  (TTY Relay 711).

 


Teen Programs in March 

Click here for the flyer!

For more info about Teens & Tweens,
check out the Teen Space.

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Youth Programs in February

Please note: The library will be CLOSED on Monday, February 20th for Presidents' Day.

Stories with Megan. Mondays, February 6th, 13th & 27th, 11:00-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a fun-filled storytime with with stories, songs and rhymes! Free. Ages 2-5. No preregistration needed. *

Spanish Musical Kids. Tuesdays, February 7th, 14th & 21st, 11:00-11:45 a.m.  Hola Amigos! Vengan a cantar y aprender! Share Constancia's love of Spanish in a program of Latin American songs and games. Free. Ages 1-5 years. No preregistration needed.  

Yoga for Kids. Wednesdays, February 1st, 8th, 15th & 22nd, 11:00-11:30. Calling all young yogis! Explore yoga poses, breathing exercises and relaxation techniques with your child. Learn from yoga instructors Anna Gephardt from Let's Grow Kids and Melissa Nutting from Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center. Free. Ages 2-5 years. No preregistration needed. *  

Music with Robert. Fridays, February 3rd, 10th & 17th (cancelled), 10:30-11:00 a.m. Sing along with Robert for great family fun! Free. All ages. No preregistration needed. *

Special Exhibition! Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human? Saturday, February 18th through Friday, March 17th. Experience an outstanding opportunity to learn from this Smithsonian traveling exhibition hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Developed by the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History and the American Library Association. Visit the exhibition during library hours or schedule a school tour: http://tinyurl.com/FFLEHOstreg. Contact Barbara Shatara or Rebecca Goldberg for more information: bshatara@burlingtonvt.gov or rgoldberg@burlingtonvt.gov. Recommended for adults and students grade 2 and up, but all are welcome.

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Youth Programs in March

Please note: The library will be CLOSED on Tuesday, March 7th for Town Meeting Day. The Picture Book area of the Youth Department will be CLOSED Monday, March 20th through Wednesday, March 22nd for a picture book reorganization project.

Stories with Megan. Mondays, March 6th & 13th, 11:00-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a fun-filled storytime with with stories, songs and rhymes! Free. Ages 2-5. No preregistration needed. *

Spanish Musical Kids. Tuesdays, March 14th, 21st & 29th 11:00-11:45 a.m.  Hola Amigos! Vengan a cantar y aprender! Share Constancia's love of Spanish in a program of Latin American songs and games. Free. Ages 1-5 years. No preregistration needed.  

Yoga for Kids. Wednesdays, March 8th, 15th, 22nd & 29th, 11:00-11:30. Calling all young yogis! Explore yoga poses, breathing exercises and relaxation techniques with your child. Learn from yoga instructors Anna Gephardt from Let's Grow Kids and Melissa Nutting from Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center. Free. Ages 2-5 years. No preregistration needed. *

Ukulele Kids! Thursday, March 30th, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Play instruments and dance to traditional children's songs. free. Ages 0-5 years. No preregistration needed. * NEW program!  

Music with Robert. Fridays, March 3rd, 10th & 17th, 10:30-11:00 a.m. Sing along with Robert for great family fun! Free. All ages. No preregistration needed. *

Special Exhibition! Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean to Be Human? continues through Friday, March 17th. Experience an outstanding opportunity to learn from this Smithsonian traveling exhibition hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Developed by the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History and the American Library Association. Visit the exhibition during library hours or schedule a school tour: http://tinyurl.com/FFLEHOstreg. Contact Barbara Shatara or Rebecca Goldberg for more information: bshatara@burlingtonvt.gov or rgoldberg@burlingtonvt.gov. More information at www.humanoriginsbtv.com. Recommended for adults and students grade 2 and up, but all are welcome.

The 7th Annual Burlington Seed Swap. Saturday, March 11th, 12:00-3:00 p.m. at the Fletcher Free Library. This free community event celebrates the upcoming gardening season and brings gardeners together to share seeds, garden stories, and resources. Bring your own non-GMO seeds to share and exchange. There also will be gardening workshops at 1:00 p.m. and 2:30 p.m., seed starting acitivites for kids, and the Friends of the Fletcher Free Library will be on hand with info about the tool lending program as well as a great selection og gardening books for sale. The Seed Swap is presented by Vermont Community Garden Network, Fletcher Free Library, and Burlington Parks Recreation & Waterfront. For more information, go to vcgn.org or call 861-4769.

Burlington Irish Heritage Festival Children's Programming. Saturday, March 18th: For more information, call the Fletcher Free Library Youth desk at 802-865-7216.

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*Please note: All groups must receive special permission to attend any program from Rebecca Goldberg. Daycares are welcome to programs with a caregiver for every two children. Please call 865.7216.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, every effort will be made to make our programs accessible to people with disabilities.  To aid us in making accommodations, please contact us a minimum of two weeks prior to the program you wish to attend.  Please call 865-7216 (TTY relay 711).